September is National Recovery Month, when the country purposefully sets time aside to celebrate stories of recovery from the disease of addiction.  It also gives us time to review the proven methods developed over many decades that have helped millions of Americans improve their lives. Liberation Programs will be hosting a number of events ourselves and are proud to be part of this national movement to recognize that recovery can, and does, happen.

But there’s always some trepidation as we approach September. We worry if our message of hope is lost somehow in all the statements that get bandied about so easily, with little exploration of accuracy. I’m sure you’ve heard some yourself. I know I’ve been in public forums where I’ve heard people say things like “only one in ten gain sobriety,” or “it’s not really a disease, it’s a lifestyle choice,” or more shockingly in 2018, “recovery medication is a crutch” (try saying that to a loved one suffering from high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease or the litany of other chronic lifelong illnesses aided through medication).

The truth is that recovery is not elusive. Not at all. Difficult, sure. Requiring patience, vigilance and support, check. But every minute of every day, it happens. Recovery isn’t some fleeting thing, outside the grasp of those who strive for it. Recovery is all around us. We are surrounded by it. Liberation Programs serves about 1,200 people each day. Come and take a tour with us in any of our facilities. Talk with people enrolled in one of our many programs. Listen to what they say and you will be amazed. The number one response I get after a tour is “I can’t believe how normal the people are. They seem happy.”  It’s true – people in recovery are often happy and we celebrate that!

August will mark my 26th year working at Liberation Programs. When I tell people this, so many ask me how I can do it – “It must be so frustrating and sad to see so much suffering,” people will say. I’ve had basically the same response for two decades:  “Sadness and frustration are part of my work, no doubt.  But where else can you witness miracles of change happen all day, every day? Families reunited. Communities re-established and strengthened. Lives saved. Who wouldn’t want to be part of that?”

Best wishes,

Cary